Home News
 

NPR The U.S.Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether U.S.
citizens may sue in American courts to reclaim property seized from their
families by the Nazis during World War II. The case involves some of the
most important Austrian artwork of the 20th century, including several
paintings by Gustav Klimt. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1698983
 

Los Angeles Times
February 25, 2004

A portrait of perseverance
U.S. Supreme Court writes the next chapter in the story of a painting, Nazi
looters and an elderly heir.

By Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer

It was a family legend: the glamorous aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer, honored with
a shimmering gold portrait by Gustav Klimt, with whom she may have shared
more than a passion for art during Vienna's belle epoque.

"Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I" passed from family treasure into history
when the Nazis took over Austria, seized the painting and made it the
centerpiece of the biggest Klimt show ever, while concealing the Jewish

History will visit the painting again today, when it will be at the heart of
the first Holocaust art theft case to reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

The court's decision on the case of "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I" and
five other Klimt paintings valued at $150 million could affect the fate of
other attempts to win indemnification for Holocaust-era claims.

However, the Supreme Court hearing will not deal with the merits of the case
to recover ownership of the paintings, filed by Bloch-Bauer's Los
Angeles-based niece, Maria Altmann, who alleges the paintings were illegally
acquired by the Austrian Gallery after they were seized by the Nazis.
Instead, U.S. justices will hear arguments over whether U.S. courts have
jurisdiction over the case.

For Altmann, the hearing is a setback in a case that has dragged on for
years. A U.S. court in Los Angeles and the San Francisco-based U.S. 9th
Circuit Court of Appeals had ruled the case could go forward in the United
States. Altmann, who turned 88 last week, is the last surviving heir of the
Bloch-Bauers and the last family witness of the shimmering pre-Nazi era
when her brilliant aunt was a strong force in the artistic and intellectual
circles of Vienna's belle epoque.

She believes Vienna's appeals have been a stalling tactic designed to keep
the case tied up indefinitely. "I will not do them the pleasure of dying,"
Altmann said at her Cheviot Hills home, flanked by birthday bouquets of pink
roses and asters from her children and grandchildren, whom she said would
continue the case if need be. Austria's attorney contends that the earlier
federal court rulings are based on the mistaken premise that World War II
events can be judged retroactively according to contemporary laws.

"The decisions are wrong as a matter of law," said Scott Cooper, of
Proskauer Rose in Century City, who will argue the case for Austria. "It has
always been the law in the United States that a change in law does not apply
to conduct that is already completed."

Cooper contends that the paintings were willed to the Austrian Gallery by
Adele Bloch-Bauer and that her husband, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, agreed to
turn over the paintings upon his death.

The Bloch-Bauer case is being closely watched by governments worldwide, who
are concerned they too could be exposed to such lawsuits, as well as by
museums and art dealers.

"These kinds of lawsuits are changing the way the art business is
conducted," said Michael Bazyler, a Whittier Law School professor who wrote
about the Altmann case in his book, "Holocaust Justice." "Prior to this
litigation, the policy seemed to be 'don't ask, don't tell,' " he said.
"Museums, galleries and collectors are becoming much more careful when they
purchase art to determine it does not have a checkered provenance."

The wrangle over her painting could hardly be more removed from the
glittering moment of history in which it was created, a time when
Bloch-Bauer was the orchestrator of one of Vienna's most vibrant artistic
and intellectual salons.

Her adoring husband commissioned the Klimt portrait. Later, he ordered a
second, and he collected several landscapes. Adele Bloch-Bauer died at age
43 of meningitis in 1925. Two years before, she had asked her husband to
donate the Klimts to the Austrian Gallery, and according to Austria, he
agreed to do it upon his own death.

But Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer was forced to give up the paintings prematurely
when the Nazis marched into Austria in 1938 and seized his home, business
and other possessions. He fled into exile.

Altmann said a letter by Bloch-Bauer proves he had no intention of
bequeathing the paintings to Nazi Austria.

"In Vienna and Bohemia, they took everything away from me," Bloch-Bauer
wrote Austrian artist Oskar Kokoschka in 1941. "Perhaps I will get the 2
[Klimt] portraits of my poor wife and my portrait. I should find out about
that this week. Otherwise, I am totally impoverished."

The U.S. Supreme Court hearing will not deal with those issues. Instead,
attorneys for both sides will argue the issue of jurisdiction, based on a
complex statute, the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act. Passed by Congress in
1976, the act protects foreign countries from lawsuits in U.S. courts except
under one of its explicitly codified exceptions.

Austria argues that the act entitles it to immunity because the alleged
violations occurred years ago. Altmann's suit, however, contends that the
marketing of the paintings' images in the United States where the
Bloch-Bauer portrait appears on promotional materials in the U.S. for the
Austrian Gallery leaves Austria open to U.S. legal action under an
exception to the act dealing with the commercialization of property taken in
violation of international law.

Academic experts are anything but united over which side is right. "My
instinct would be to think that our courts have jurisdiction," said Robert
Benson, a professor at Loyola Marymount law school who teaches international
human rights law. "There's no reason not to haul it into our courts and
abide by the honest rules of business."

"I think the plaintiffs are probably swimming upstream," said law professor
Leila Sadat, an expert on international criminal and human rights law at
Washington University, who thinks U.S. officials worry that granting
jurisdiction would open U.S. courts to similar lawsuits.

"The issue of sovereign immunity is very subject to politics," said Mark
Zaid, whose $2.7-billion civil suit against Libya on behalf of the families
of the victims of the 1988 Pan Am jetliner bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland,
did prevail on a retroactive use of a 1996 amendment to the Foreign
Sovereign Immunities Act. "There are two things that motivate the
government: Could the U.S. be sued for similar actions? And what's the level
of friendship with that country?" Zaid said.

The cases are also arousing deep emotions as plaintiffs, many of them
elderly, seek "tangible links to lives that were decimated," according to
Sarah Jackson, the Holocaust expert at the Art Loss Register in London.
Maria Altmann is no exception.

To her, the Bloch-Bauer Klimts are among the few visible remnants of her
happy life as the privileged daughter of a well-to-do, cultured Jewish
family in Vienna. As a child, Altmann was in awe of her distinguished,
elegant aunt. She grew up hearing whispered stories about her aunt's
relationship with Klimt, who painted his muse as a pale siren, floating on a
glittering background of gold.

Life as Altmann knew it ended when Adolf Hitler annexed Austria in 1938.
Adele and Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer's home was "Aryanized." Friends were sent to
death camps. Ferdinand fled to Zurich, and the portrait of his wife was sent
to the Austrian Gallery with a cover letter signed, "Heil Hitler."

When Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer died penniless in a Zurich hotel room in 1945, he
had made up a new will, naming Altmann and her now-deceased siblings as
heirs.

"Adele loved Vienna," Altmann said. "But so much changed. So many of her
friends committed suicide, were killed, were driven out. To think she would
have wanted to leave the paintings to those people! * It's unbelievable."

In Austria, the emblematic gold portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer is considered
patrimony, and Klimt has become a talisman of Vienna's artistic golden age.
Even the value of minor Klimts has skyrocketed: A Klimt landscape, the 1914
"Landhaus am Attersee," recently fetched $29.1 million at Sotheby's.

Altmann said she would like to see the paintings in Canadian and U.S.
museums, such as the Getty. She will attend the Supreme Court hearing with
her three sons and two adult grandsons.

If the Supreme Court rules the U.S. has no jurisdiction, "it obviously makes
the prosecution of the case very difficult," said Randol Schoenberg, the
attorney representing Altmann. . "It will make it difficult to decide the
case on its own merits: Did Adele Bloch-Bauer give Austria the rights to the
painting? The answer is no," he said.

Today, Adele Bloch-Bauer stares out from a Klimt reproduction on Altmann's
living room wall, her level gaze cool, her features decisive. Her portrait
faces an original portrait of Adele's sister Altmann's lovely mother,
Therese by a lesser artist who rendered Therese as a conventionally
feminine vision of pink roses and satin, her blandly demure gaze a contrast
to Adele's fiercely individual stare.

"I don't think she was beautiful," Altmann said of her aunt. "But she had so
much character. If Adele was alive," she said, "she would have wanted to
argue the case herself."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Staff researcher Robin Mayper assisted with this report.
 

PRI's The World
http://www.theworld.org/content/02249.wma
 

Der Standard
24. Februar 2004
15:05 MEZ   "Spur des Nazi-Raubs führt zum Höchstgericht"
"USA-Today": Es geht beim Rechtsstreit um sehr viel - Im Falle einer
Entscheidung für Altmann könnten andere Multimillionen-Dollar-Klagen folgen
Link

USA Today:
"Trail of Nazi plunder leads to high court"
 

   Washington - "Die Spur des Nazi-Raubs führt zum Höchstgericht", ist der
Titel eines Artikels in der Zeitung "USA Today" über die Klage von
Bloch-Bauer-Nichte Maria Altmann gegen die Republik Österreich auf
Herausgabe von sechs Klimt-Bildern.

Türe für Multimillionen-Dollar-Klagen geöffnet

"Es geht um sehr viel. Wenn Altmann gewinnt, dann könnte dies nach Ansicht
von Analysten die Türe für Multimillionen-Dollar-Klagen gegen staatliche
Galerien auf der ganzen Welt öffnen, in denen deren Ansprüche auf Kunst aus
der Zeit des Zweiten Weltkriegs und anderer Objekte mit strittigem Eigentum
in Frage gestellt werden. Laut Rechts-Experten der Kunstszene ist die Zahl
derartiger Streitigkeiten in den vergangenen Jahren gestiegen, auch wenn es
bei den meisten um von den Nazis geraubte Kunstwerke geht", schreibt
"USA-Today".

Flut von Schadenersatzklagen gegen ausländische Regierungen

Die Zeitung weiter: "Ein Sieg von Altmann könnte auch eine Klagsflut von
Schadenersatzklagen gegen ausländische Regierungen eröffnen, in denen diese
wegen der Untaten ihrer Vorgängerregierungen haftbar gemacht warden. In New
York City klagen Holocaust-Überlebende die französischen staatlichen
Eisenbahnen, die Juden in die Todeslager der Nazis führten. Ehemalige
'Sex-Sklaven' und Zwangsarbeiter haben die Regierungen von Mexiko und Japan
geklagt, bisher ohne Erfolg.

Laut Theodore Olson, höchster Anwalt des US-Justizministeriums, könnte ein
Sieg von Altmann die amerikanische Außenpolitik unterminieren und
ausländische Gerichte zu Klagen gegen die USA ermutigen. Er hat sich dem
Fall auf Seiten Österreichs angeschlossen. Für Altmann ist es eine
persönliche Angelegenheit. Sie sagt, sie könne die 'Ungerechtigkeit' nicht
ertragen dass die Meisterwerke ihrer Familie in Österreich bleiben, das in
ihren Augen im besten Fall ein passiver Zuseher war als die Juden des Landes
vernichtet wurden." (APA)

Streit Um Klimt-Bilder:
Supreme Court entscheidet über Klage gegen Österreich

(Die Presse) 23.02.2004

Das US-Höchstgericht beschäftigt sich am Mittwoch mit dem Streit um sechs
Klimt-Gemälde, die im Belvedere hängen.
 

WIEN (fa). Ein Streit um sechs Gemälde von Gustav Klimt, ein juristisch
umstrittenes Testament und eine Klage gegen die Republik Österreich auf
amerikanischem Boden. Das sind die explosiven Ingredienzien im Rechtsstreit
Maria V. Altmann gegen die Republik Österreich, der übermorgen den Supreme
Court in Washington D. C. beschäftigt. Das Hearing am Mittwoch soll dem
US-Höchstgericht die Grundlagen für seine Entscheidung in einer
völkerrechtlichen Vorfrage liefern, die für den Ausgang des eigentlichen
Verfahrens (wem gehören die wertvollen Gemälde?) von vorentscheidender
Bedeutung ist: Kann die Republik Österreich vor einem US-Gericht geklagt
werden?

Grundsätzlich gilt im Völkerrecht nämlich die Regel, dass kein Staat über
einen anderen zu Gericht sitzen kann. Der "Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act"
(FSIA) legt allerdings jene Ausnahmen im US-Recht fest, in denen diese Regel
gebrochen werden kann. Drei US-Instanzen sind bisher davon ausgegangen, dass
ein Klagerecht in den USA besteht.

Anknüpfungspunkt für diese Rechtsmeinung ist eine Bestimmung im FSIA, die
eine amerikanische Zuständigkeit vorsieht, wenn kommerzielle Aktivitäten des
Beklagten in den USA vorliegen. Im konkreten Fall sind damit
Werbeaktivitäten der Österreichischen Galerie gemeint, die auch in Amerika
um Besucher des Belvederes in Wien wirbt.

Zwei Indizien sprechen allerdings dafür, dass Österreich gute Chancen hat,
bei seinem ersten Auftritt vor dem Supreme Court seit dem Bestehen der USA
zu obsiegen. Zum einen hat das amerikanische Justizministerium mit einem
sogenannten "Amicus-curiae"-Brief im Verfahren Position für Österreich
bezogen und dafür plädiert, die österreichische Immunität gegen Forderungen
vor einem US-Gericht zu akzeptieren.

Zum Zweiten ist es äußerst selten, dass der Supreme Court eine Entscheidung
der Unterinstanzen an sich zieht. Was dafür spricht, dass das Höchstgericht
die bisher getroffenen Entscheidungen korrigieren könnte. Gottfried Toman,
der in der Finanzprokuratur für den Fall zuständig ist, zeigt sich
optimistisch, dass sich Österreichs Position durchsetzt. Sollte die Klage
dennoch in den USA angenommen werden, müsste das US-Gericht österreichisches
Recht anwenden, um zu klären, wem das Eigentum an den Bildern zukommt.

Die in den USA lebende Maria Altmann, eine Erbin nach dem 1945 verstorbenen
Industriellen Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, erhebt Anspruch auf sechs Gemälde von
Gustav Klimt, die Teil der Sammlung der Österreichischen Galerie sind. Doch
die auf Grundlage des Streitwertes von 150 Millionen Euro berechneten
Gerichtskosten bewogen Altmann-Anwalt Randol Schoenberg, die Klage gegen
Österreich vor einem US-Gericht einzubringen. Dort fallen keine Kosten an.

Die Entscheidung des Supreme Courts, die frühestens für Ende April erwartet
wird, könnte dem Verfahren ein jähes Ende bereiten. Denn Schoenberg will
sich noch nicht festlegen, ob seine Mandantin auch in Österreich das
Verfahren fortführen würde.

Kurier 24.2.2004

KULTUR
http://www.kurier.at/kultur/536331.php

Klimt-Bilder: Anhörung vor US-Gericht

Die 88-jährige Maria Altmann lebt heute in Los Angeles. Sie fordert die
Herausgabe der Klimt-Bilder.
Washington- Das US-Höchstgericht befasst sich am Mittwoch in einer Anhörung
mit dem Rechtsstreit um sechs wertvolle Klimt-Bilder, in dem die
Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte strittig ist. Im Verfahren fordert Klägerin
Maria Altmann, eine Nichte von Adele Bloch-Bauer, die Herausgabe der Bilder
von der Republik Österreich. Die 88-jährige Altmann war vor den Nazis aus
Österreich geflüchtet und lebt heute in Los Angeles, sie will bei der
Verhandlung in Washington anwesend sein. Ihr Anwalt Randol Schoenberg
argumentiert, dass die Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte für den Fall gegeben
ist, die beklagte Republik Österreich bestreitet dies.

Staatenimmunität

Das Verfahren ist damit im Streit um die Zuständigkeit in der höchsten
US-Instanz angelangt. Maria Altmann hatte im August 2000 vor einem Gericht
in Los Angeles ihre Klage gegen die Republik Österreich eingebracht. Diese
beruft sich aber auf die Staatenimmunität und bestreitet daher eine
Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte. Sie hat gegen die Entscheidung eines
kalifornischen Berufungsgerichts zu Gunsten der Klägerin Altmann Revision
eingelegt, die vom US-Höchstgericht angenommen wurde.

Bei der mündlichen Anhörung am Mittwoch haben die neun Richter rund eine
Stunde lang Gelegenheit, an den Anwalt der beklagten Republik Österreich,
Scott Cooper, an den Anwalt der Klägerin Altmann, Randol Schoenberg, sowie
an den Vertreter der US-Regierung Fragen zu stellen. Dabei wird vermutlich
primär die Rechtsgrundlage für die von der Klägerin behauptete Zuständigkeit
der US-Gerichtsbarkeit erörtert. Eine inhaltliche Prüfung der Klage findet
aber keinesfalls statt. Präsident des US-Höchstgerichts ist der konservative
Richter William Rehnquist.

Rückgabeansprüche

In dem Prozess geht es um Rückgabeansprüche betreffend der Bilder "Adele
Bloch-Bauer I", "Adele Bloch-Bauer II", "Apfelbaum I", "Buchenwald
(Birkenwald)" und "Häuser in Unterach am Attersee" sowie "Amalie
Zuckerkandl" von Gustav Klimt. Die ersten fünf davon sind im Testament von
Adele Bloch-Bauer erwähnt, in dem sie ihren Mann Ferdinand bat, nach seinem
Tod die Bilder der Republik Österreich bzw. der Österreichischen Galerie zu
schenken.

Der jüdische Industrielle und Gegner der Nationalsozialisten, Ferdinand
Bloch-Bauer, wurde aber in der NS-Zeit enteignet und musste in die Schweiz
flüchten, die Bilder wurden noch zu seinen Lebzeiten von einem von den Nazis
eingesetzten "kommissarischen Verwalter" an das Museum übergeben bzw.
verkauft. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer hatte in seinem Testament seinen Neffen und
seine zwei Nichten als Alleinerben eingesetzt. Das dem Zuständigkeitsstreit
folgende Gerichtsverfahren soll klären, wer rechtmäßiger Eigentümer der
Bilder ist: die Republik Österreich oder Bloch-Bauer-Nichte und -Erbin
Altmann.
 
 

Artikel vom 23.02.2004 |apa |grü
http://www.kurier.at/kultur/537354.php

Klimt-Bilder: Von Gehrer enttäuscht

Insgesamt geht es um sechs wertvolle Klimt-Bilder, die von den Nazis
konfisziert wurden.
Washington - Die Klägerin im Rechtsstreit um die Herausgabe von sechs
wertvollen Klimt-Bildern, Maria Altmann, ist von dem Verhalten der
österreichischen Regierung ihr gegenüber enttäuscht. Insbesondere von
Ministerin Elisabeth Gehrer (V) habe sie zumindest Gesprächsbereitschaft
erwartet, kritisiert Altmann. Doch die offiziellen Vertreter Österreichs
hätten "nicht ein einziges Mal" versucht, mit ihr eine gütliche Einigung im
Bilderstreit zu finden. Daher habe sie schließlich den Rechtsweg
eingeschlagen, so die heute 88-jährige Nichte von Adele und Ferdinand
Bloch-Bauer.

Österreich erstmals vor US-Gericht

Mit diesem Rechtsstreit "Altmann gegen die Republik Österreich" wird sich am
Mittwoch das US-Höchstgericht in einer Verhandlung befassen. Die Republik
bestreitet die Zuständigkeit von US-Gerichten für den Fall, zwei untere
Instanzen haben der Klägerin bisher Recht gegeben und sehen eine
Jurisdiktion in den USA gegeben. Es ist nach Angaben des Rechtsanwalts von
Altmann, Randol Schoenberg, der erste Fall, in dem sich Österreich vor dem
amerikanischen Höchstgericht verantworten muss. "Es hätte nicht so weit
kommen müssen, doch jetzt ist es zu spät", betont Altmann.

Meinung geändert

Maria Altmann meint der Rechtsstreit hätte vermieden werden können, wenn die
zuständige Vertreterin in der Bundesregierung, Ministerin Gehrer, und der
Vertreter der Finanzprokuratur, Gottfried Toman, mit ihr geredet hätten.
"Sogar das Gericht hat sie aufgefordert mit mir zu verhandeln, aber sie
haben ja nicht einmal meinen Brief beantwortet", klagt sie. Ursprünglich
habe sie nicht beabsichtigt, dass die Klimt-Bilder aus Österreich
weggebracht werden sollten. "Das ist so ein wunderschönes Land mit vielen
netten Menschen", so die 88-Jährige über ihre frühere Heimat Österreich.
Doch wegen des unfreundlichen Verhaltens ihr gegenüber habe sie ihre Meinung
geändert. Heute möchte die vor den Nazis aus Wien geflüchtete Altmann, dass
die Klimt-Bilder in Museen in den USA und in Kanada ausgestellt werden.
 
 

Artikel vom 24.02.2004 |apa |stp

Klimt-Bilder: Anhörung vor US-Höchstgericht über Zuständigkeit

88-jährige Bloch-Bauer-Erbin Maria Altmann klagte Republik Österreich auf
Herausgabe von sechs Bildern - Entscheidung erst in einigen Monaten erwartet
 

Washington (APA) - Das US-Höchstgericht befasst sich am Mittwoch (25.
Februar) in einer Anhörung mit dem Rechtsstreit um sechs wertvolle
Klimt-Bilder, in dem die Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte strittig ist. Im
Verfahren fordert Klägerin Maria Altmann, eine Nichte von Adele Bloch-Bauer,
die Herausgabe der Bilder von der Republik Österreich. Die 88-jährige
Altmann war vor den Nazis aus Österreich geflüchtet und lebt heute in Los
Angeles, sie will bei der Verhandlung in Washington anwesend sein. Ihr
Anwalt Randol Schoenberg argumentiert, dass die Zuständigkeit der
US-Gerichte für den Fall gegeben ist, die beklagte Republik Österreich
bestreitet dies.

Das Verfahren ist damit im Streit um die Zuständigkeit in der höchsten
US-Instanz angelangt. Maria Altmann hatte im August 2000 vor einem Gericht
in Los Angeles ihre Klage gegen die Republik Österreich eingebracht. Diese
beruft sich aber auf die Staatenimmunität und bestreitet daher eine
Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte. Sie hat gegen die Entscheidung eines
kalifornischen Berufungsgerichts zu Gunsten der Klägerin Altmann Revision
eingelegt, die vom US-Höchstgericht angenommen wurde.

Bei der mündlichen Anhörung am Mittwoch (11 Uhr Ortszeit - 17 Uhr MEZ) haben
die neun Richter rund eine Stunde lang Gelegenheit, an den Anwalt der
beklagten Republik Österreich, Scott Cooper, an den Anwalt der Klägerin
Altmann, Randol Schoenberg, sowie an den Vertreter der US-Regierung Fragen
zu stellen. Dabei wird vermutlich primär die Rechtsgrundlage für die von der
Klägerin behauptete Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichtsbarkeit erörtert. Eine
inhaltliche Prüfung der Klage findet aber keinesfalls statt. Präsident des
US-Höchstgerichts ist der konservative Richter William Rehnquist.

Am Freitag werden die neun Höchstrichter dann in einer nichtöffentlichen
Sitzung den Fall noch einmal diskutieren und über ein Urteil abstimmen.
Anschließend wird ein Richter mit der schriftlichen Ausfertigung des Urteils
beauftragt. Die Entscheidung des Höchstgerichts, ob in dem Fall US-Gerichte
zuständig sind oder nicht, wird aber vermutlich erst in zwei bis drei
Monaten veröffentlicht werden.

In dem Prozess geht es um Rückgabeansprüche betreffend der Bilder "Adele
Bloch-Bauer I", "Adele Bloch-Bauer II", "Apfelbaum I", "Buchenwald
(Birkenwald)" und "Häuser in Unterach am Attersee" sowie "Amalie
Zuckerkandl" von Gustav Klimt. Die ersten fünf davon sind im Testament von
Adele Bloch-Bauer erwähnt, in dem sie ihren Mann Ferdinand bat, nach seinem
Tod die Bilder der Republik Österreich bzw. der Österreichischen Galerie zu
schenken.

Der jüdische Industrielle und Gegner der Nationalsozialisten, Ferdinand
Bloch-Bauer, wurde aber in der NS-Zeit enteignet und musste in die Schweiz
flüchten, die Bilder wurden noch zu seinen Lebzeiten von einem von den Nazis
eingesetzten "kommissarischen Verwalter" an das Museum übergeben bzw.
verkauft. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer hatte in seinem Testament seinen Neffen und
seine zwei Nichten als Alleinerben eingesetzt. Das dem Zuständigkeitsstreit
folgende Gerichtsverfahren soll klären, wer rechtmäßiger Eigentümer der
Bilder ist: die Republik Österreich oder Bloch-Bauer-Nichte und -Erbin
Altmann.

2004-02-23 11:08:03

    ZURÜCK