Home News

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 today that Maria Altmann's suit against the Republic of Austria for the recovery of her family's six Klimt paintings can proceed.  The opinion can be found at

http://www.bslaw.net/altmann/briefs/opinion

or

http://supct.law.cornell.edu:8080/supct/pdf/03-13P.ZO

Thank you to all who supported us.  More information on the case can be found at http://www.adele.at and http://www.bslaw.net/news.

Randol Schoenberg
 

Supreme Court says foreign governments can face lawsuits in America
By GINA HOLLAND Associated Press Writer

   WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that Americans can sue foreign governments over looted art, stolen property and war crimes dating to the 1930s, a victory for an elderly California woman trying to get back $150 million worth of paintings stolen by the Nazis more than 65 years ago.

   Justices said that the governments are not protected from lawsuits in U.S. courts over old claims.
   Maria Altmann, who fled Austria, had attended the Supreme Court argument and said justices were one of her last hopes for the return of six Gustav Klimt paintings, including two colorful, impressionistic portraits of her aunt.

   She filed a lawsuit against the Austrian government in federal court in California, and won rulings that allowed her to pursue the case.

   Justices agreed 6-3, a ruling that emboldens victims of wartime atrocities to pursue lawsuits. Women who claim they were used as sex slaves during World War II have sued Japan, and Holocaust survivors and heirs have brought a case against the French national railroad for transporting more than 70,000 Jews and others to Nazi concentration camps. Those cases are pending at the Supreme Court.

   Justice John Paul Stevens, writing for the majority, said that the State Department can still ask courts to dismiss such lawsuits.

   But he said that suits are not barred by a 1976 law, or a 1952 U.S. government policy that shielded some countries from lawsuits while allowing suits against some foreign government commercial ventures.

   Nazis had looted the possessions of Altmann's wealthy Jewish family, including the prized paintings that now hang in the Austrian Gallery. She and her husband escaped to America after she had been detained and her husband imprisoned in labor camp.

   In a dissent, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy joined by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas said the decision «injects great prospective uncertainty into our relations with foreign sovereigns.»

Austria Can Be Sued in U.S. Over Nazi-Seized Art
Mon Jun 7, 2004 11:35 AM ET
By James Vicini

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Austrian government and its national museum can be sued in the United States by an 88-year-old Los Angeles woman seeking to recover six valuable paintings she claimed the Nazis took from her uncle during World War II, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday

By a 6-3 vote, the justices upheld a ruling that rejected a request by Austria and its government-run gallery to dismiss the lawsuit involving the paintings valued at $135 million by the famous Austrian artist Gustav Klimt.

The case stemmed from a lawsuit filed in 2000 in federal court in California by Maria Altmann claiming the wrongful taking of the paintings that have been on display in the Austrian Gallery.

The paintings were owned by Altmann's uncle, Ferdinand Bloch, a Jewish Czech sugar magnate, and included two portraits of his wife. When she died in 1925, she left a will requesting him to leave the artwork to the Austrian Gallery upon his death.

The Nazis seized the paintings when they invaded Austria in 1938. Bloch, who had supported anti-Nazi efforts before Adolf Hitler annexed Austria, fled Vienna for Switzerland, where he died in 1945.

In his will, Bloch left everything to his nephew and nieces, including Altmann. But his family agreed in 1946 that the paintings belonged to the Austrian government, based on his wife's will.

Altmann, who fled to California to escape the Nazis and is Ferdinand Bloch's sole surviving heir, claimed the family was extorted into signing away its rights to the paintings in 1946 and had been lied to by the Austrian government.

A federal judge in California and then a U.S. appeals court refused to dismiss the lawsuit.

The Supreme Court agreed the case can go forward. Justice John Paul Stevens said in the majority opinion that there is an exception to the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976 for cases in which property has been taken in violation of international law.

He said the exception would apply to the alleged wrongdoing at issue in the case, even though it occurred before the law's adoption in 1976 and even before the State Department in 1952 adopted a new, restrictive theory on when a foreign state can claim sovereign immunity.

Stevens emphasized the holding in the case was very narrow, only concerning the reach of the 1976 law. He left open the possibility that Austria and the museum still could win when the case goes back to a lower court for more hearings.

The U.S. Justice Department supported Austria in its appeal, as did the Japanese and Mexican governments, while the Austrian Jewish Community, the American Jewish Congress and the American Jewish Committee all supported Altmann.

Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justices Anthony Kennedy and Clarence Thomas dissented.

"The court abruptly tells foreign nations this important principle of American law is unavailable to them in our courts," Kennedy wrote of the general rule against making U.S. laws apply retroactively.

"The court, in addition, injects great prospective uncertainty into our relations with foreign sovereigns," he added.
 

Justices Allow Suit Against Austria on Art Seized by Nazis

June 7, 2004
By DAVID STOUT

WASHINGTON, June 7 - The Supreme Court ruled today that
United States courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits
involving art and other property stolen by the Nazis nearly
seven decades ago, a decision that some justices said could
affect American diplomacy.

The justices found, by a margin of 6 to 3, that an elderly
California woman's efforts to regain possession of
paintings once owned by her uncle, a sugar magnate and art
patron in Austria before World War II, can be resolved in
the United States despite a 1976 law that defines the terms
for suing foreign governments in the federal courts.

That law, the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, provides
some exceptions to the general rule that foreign
governments are immune from suits. A technical but
all-important question was whether the act can be applied
retroactively.

Justice John Paul Stevens held for the majority that it
can. "We find clear evidence that Congress intended the act
to apply to pre-enactment conduct," he wrote.

Today's ruling does not address the merits of the suit
brought by Maria V. Altmann, who is in her late 80's and
has described the American court system as her last chance
in a decadeslong quest to retrieve the remains of the art
collection of her uncle, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer. Rather, the
justices ruled that the case can at least proceed in the
federal courts.

At issue are six paintings by Gustav Klimt, including two
portraits of Mr. Bloch-Bauer's wife, Adele. The six works
are in the Austrian Gallery in Vienna and are said to be
worth more than $100 million.

Austria has maintained that the paintings were left to the
state and its museums under the will of Adele Bloch-Bauer,
who died in 1925. The fact that the Nazis had illegitimate
possession of them during World War II does not chance the
reality that they properly belong to Austria now, that
country argues.

Ms. Altmann disputes that version of events. She contends
that her aunt's wishes for the disposition of the paintings
never achieved the status of a formal bequest to the
government. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer fled Vienna in 1938, at
the time of the German annexation of Austria, and died in
1945.

Ms. Altmann settled in California after the war and became
an American citizen. She turned to the federal courts after
learning that a suit in the Austrian courts would cost
nearly $2 million, since filing fees are based on a
percentage of the amount in dispute.

Today's ruling upheld a Federal District Court decision and
one by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth
Circuit, in San Francisco, both of which had refused
Austria's motions to dismiss the case. Joining Justice
Stevens in the majority today in Austria v. Altmann, 03-13,
were Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, David H.
Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer.

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote a dissent joined by Chief
Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justice Clarence Thomas.
The dissenters did not see the leeway that the majority
discerned on the retroactivity issue. Quoting from a court
ruling nearly 200 years ago, Justice Kennedy wrote, "It is
a principle in the English common law, as ancient as the
law itself, that a statute, even of the omnipotent
Parliament, is not to have a retrospective effect."

The dissenters said the majority's holding could resurrect
and bring into the courts issues supposedly resolved
"generations ago, including claims that have been the
subject of international negotiation and agreement."

The State Department can still ask the courts to dismiss
cases against foreign governments, but today's ruling
indicates that there is no certainty the dismissal motions
will be granted.

The full ramifications of today's ruling may not become
clear for some time, but it is sure to hearten plaintiffs
in other cases dealing with events from World War II.

Last June, for instance, a federal appeals case in New York
reinstated a suit by Holocaust survivors and their heirs
against the French national railroad for transporting
thousands of Jews and others to Nazi death camps. That
decision has been appealed to the Supreme Court.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/07/politics/07CND-SCOT.html?ex=1087634257&ei=1&en=4faa0ccf703ea487

Supreme Court Clears Lawsuits for Art Stolen by the Nazis
Decision Says Foreign Governments Can be Sued Over Lost Property

By Fred Barbash
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, June 7, 2004; 1:26 PM
 

The Supreme Court today opened the federal courts to some lawsuits seeking to right the wrongs committed by foreign governments during the World War II era.
 

The court, in a 6-3 decision involving priceless Gustav Klimt paintings seized from a Jewish family by the Nazis, rejected Austria's argument that the 1976 law permitting such suits cannot be applied retroactively, that is, to events before 1976.

The decision does not mean that Maria Altmann, now 88, can recover the paintings that once belonged to her family. It does allow her, and others like her, to pursue her claim in the federal courts and try to recover the works of art, estimated to be worth more than $150 million.

Among the paintings is one of Klimt's most famous works, a "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer," Altmann's aunt.

The ruling could conceivably provide some assistance to other World War II era claims, such as those brought by women who say they were used as sex slaves by Japan during World War II and by Holocaust survivors who have sued the French national railroad for transporting thousands of Jews to Nazi concentration camps.

But Justice John Paul Stevens, who wrote for the court, noted that the holding was narrow in its application.

The paintings at issue in the case had hung in the Vienna home of Maria Altmann's uncle and aunt, Ferdinand and Adele Bloch-Bauer. Bloch-Bauer's will asked that after her death, her husband donate the paintings to the Austrian national gallery. She died in 1925.

But Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer left Vienna after the Nazis took over Austria in 1938 and rewrote his will to leave his property to relatives, including Altmann, who also had taken refuge in the United States.

Meanwhile, Nazi lawyers seized the paintings and put them in the gallery, where Austria wants them to remain as national treasures.

Altmann sued Austria under the 1976 Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, which permits limited types of suits against foreign governments.

The government of Austria, supported by the Justice Department, argued that the law did not apply to events before the law's enactment -- especially to events that occurred 30 or 40 years before -- and that the federal courts had no authority to hear Altmann's suit.

Stevens, joined by Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, David Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer, said that Congress was "unambiguous" in wanting the federal courts to adjudicate such suits, regardless of the passage of time.

Altmann's lawyer and family friend, E. Randol Schoenberg, described her as "ecstatic" today. Because of her age, he said, "I hope we can get the case heard before the end of the year."

But, he noted, Austria could "still raise more issues. Their position is that the will is clear: It gives the paintings to Austria."

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy dissented, joined by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justice Clarence Thomas.

The decision, said the dissenters, will "weaken the reasoning and diminish the force of the rule against retroactivity" of laws. In the context of numerous treaties and agreements with foreign governments, the ruling is especially troubling, Kennedy wrote.

The case is Republic of Austria et al v. Maria V. Altmann.

Austria Can Be Sued Over Looted Paintings, Court Says (Update3)

June 7 (Bloomberg) -- Foreign countries can be forced to face some U.S. lawsuits over World War II-era property disputes, the U.S. Supreme Court said in letting a woman sue Austria over paintings worth $150 million taken from her family by the Nazis.

The 6-3 ruling allows 88-year-old Maria V. Altmann of Los Angeles to pursue her claim over six paintings by Gustav Klimt that were stolen from her uncle in Vienna by the Nazis. The paintings are held by the Austrian Gallery in Vienna.

Before 1952 the U.S. gave foreign nations full immunity from lawsuits in U.S. courts. A 1952 State Department policy began allowing suits against foreign nations over their commercial acts. In 1976 Congress enacted the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, which spelled out the 1952 policy and allowed suits over property taken in violation of international law.

``We find clear evidence that Congress intended the act to apply to pre-enactment conduct'' occurring before Congress intervened, Justice John Paul Stevens wrote for the court. Still, Stevens said the ruling was a narrow one and that Austria can try to get Altmann's suit thrown out on other grounds.

Stevens said the U.S. State Department also can ask federal courts not to hear certain cases involving foreign sovereign immunity. Such requests ``might well be entitled to deference as the considered judgment of the executive on a particular question of foreign policy,'' he said.

Largest Collection

``I'm very, very happy,'' Altmann said in a telephone interview. ``I have a feeling they will now have to come to the table and talk.''

``We're going to go forward with the lawsuit in California,'' said her lawyer, E. Randol Schoenberg of Burris & Schoenberg in Los Angeles. ``We hope for an early trial date. My client is, after all, 88 years old.''

Schoenberg said Altmann's case was unusual because it involved artwork, and a January 2001 executive agreement between the U.S. and Austria preserved claims over Nazi-looted artwork.

Austria's lawyer, Scott P. Cooper of Proskauer Rose LLP in Los Angeles, said there are ``a great many issues yet to be resolved in the case.''

Altmann's suit says the Nazis took the paintings from her uncle, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, who died in 1945. The dispute concerns whether he left the paintings to Altmann and other relatives, or whether his wife Adele left them to Austria when she died in 1925.

Austrian Gallery

The Austrian Gallery, housed in two former palaces in Vienna, has the world's largest collection of Klimt paintings.

Schoenberg said when the Supreme Court granted review in September that one of the paintings, a portrait of Adele Bloch- Bauer, is one of Klimt's most famous paintings and was on the cover of the museum's guidebook.

Lawyers for Altmann, a U.S. citizen, said in court papers that Austria and the gallery failed ``to comply with their postwar duties and obligations to return the paintings to their rightful owners.'' Her lawyers said she was denied a chance to sue in Austria because she couldn't afford the $2 million filing fee.

Altmann sued Austria and the gallery in Los Angeles in 2000. A federal judge ruled that she could pursue her claim, and the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed.

In appealing to the Supreme Court, Austria's lawyers argued that the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act's provisions allowing some suits against foreign countries in U.S. courts don't apply retroactively to World War II-era conduct.

`Events Long Past'

The Bush administration supported Austria in a brief that said new federal laws generally don't apply to ``events long past.''

Altmann's lawyers argued that a 2001 agreement between the U.S. and Austria preserves individual claims for Nazi-looted art. Her lawyers also said she was suing over Austria's current refusal to return the paintings, not over the taking of the paintings by the Nazis.

The Supreme Court ruled for Altmann. Joining Stevens's opinion were Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, David H. Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer.

Dissenting were Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justices Anthony M. Kennedy and Clarence Thomas.

Writing for the three, Kennedy said the decision ``promises unfortunate disruption'' by leaving the door open for the State Department to object to courts hearing some cases.

The case is Austria v. Altmann, 03-13.

Court: Americans can sue over war crimes
By GINA HOLLAND
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled Monday that Americans can sue foreign governments over looted art, stolen property and war crimes dating to the 1930s, a victory for an elderly California woman trying to get back $150 million worth of paintings stolen by the Nazis more than 65 years ago.

Justices said that the governments are not necessarily protected from lawsuits in U.S. courts over old claims. But those claims could still face stumbling blocks.

Maria Altmann, who fled Austria, had attended the Supreme Court argument. The 88-year-old said the court was one of her last hopes for the return of six Gustav Klimt paintings, including two colorful, impressionistic portraits of her aunt.

Nazis had looted the possessions of Altmann's wealthy Jewish family, including the prized paintings that now hang in the Austrian Gallery. She and her husband escaped to America after she had been detained and her husband imprisoned in labor camp.

She filed a lawsuit against the Austrian government in federal court in California, and won rulings that allowed her to pursue the case.

Justices agreed 6-3, a ruling that emboldens victims of wartime atrocities to pursue lawsuits. Women who claim they were used as sex slaves during World War II have sued Japan, and Holocaust survivors and heirs have brought a case against the French national railroad for transporting more than 70,000 Jews and others to Nazi concentration camps.

Those cases are pending at the Supreme Court and will likely be sent back to lower courts in light of Monday's decision.

Justice John Paul Stevens, writing for the majority, said that the State Department can still ask courts to dismiss such lawsuits.

At issue in the case was a 1976 law that spelled out when other countries can be sued in the United States. The law was based on a 1952 State Department policy. The Supreme Court ruled that the law is retroactive, and can be used to bring old claims.

In a dissent, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy joined by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas said the decision "injects great prospective uncertainty into our relations with foreign sovereigns."

"The court opens foreign nations worldwide to vast and potential liability for expropriation claims in regards to conduct that occurred generations ago, including claims that have been the subject of international negotiation and agreement," Kennedy wrote.

It was not clear if the court's decision will lead to many successes in old cases.

A Bush administration lawyer had told justices that it would be unprecedented to have U.S. judges resolving lawsuits against foreign countries over expropriated property. The administration argued it would harm America's relations with those countries.

Stevens said the Supreme Court's decision was a narrow one - permitting some lawsuits without deciding the specific merits of the Altmann case.

Justice Stephen Breyer, in a concurring opinion, said that Americans will still likely have to pursue claims in foreign countries first, and they may face other obstacles in U.S. courts, including statutes of limitations. Breyer is one of two Jewish members on the court.

The case is Austria v. Altmann, 03-13.
 

Österreich kann in USA verklagt werden
     Eine wichtige Entscheidung ist nun in dem seit Jahren andauernden Rechtsstreit um sechs kostbare Klimt-Bilder gefallen: Das Höchstgericht in Washington entschied, dass US-Gerichte für den Besitzstreit zwischen der in Kalifornien lebenden Maria Altmann (88) und der Republik Österreich zuständig sind. Der frühere Besitzer musste - so wie seine Nichte Altmann - vor den Nazis flüchten und die Bilder zurücklassen. Dies bedeutet eine empfindliche Niederlage für die Republik - mit möglicherweise weit reichenden Folgen.

Republik nicht immun
Streit um Klimt-Bilder kann nun vor US-Gerichten fortgesetzt werden.

       Das US-Höchstgericht in Washington hat die Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichte im Rechtsstreit um die Klimt-Bilder zwischen Maria Altmann und der Republik Österreich anerkannt.

In dem Streit geht es um sechs kostbare Klimt-Bilder der Familie Bloch-Bauer, deren Wert auf rund 150 Mio. Dollar (122 Mio. Euro) geschätzt wird. Bloch-Bauer-Erbin Altmann fordert die Herausgabe der Bilder von der Republik Österreich.

Sechs Richter dafür, drei dagegen

Die Entscheidung des US-Höchstgerichts wurde mit Mehrheit für die in Los Angeles lebende Klägerin, Maria Altmann, getroffen. Sechs Richter entschieden gemäß ihres Antrags, drei sprachen sich dagegen aus.

Die beklagte Republik Österreich hatte gefordert die Klage auf Herausgabe der Klimt-Bilder aus völkerrechtlichen Gründen der Staaten-Immunität abzuweisen.

Grünes Licht für Verfahren über Bilder

In dem Verfahren wird seit dem Jahr 2000 vor US-Gerichten um die Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichtsbarkeit gerungen. Nach der endgültigen Entscheidung des Höchstgerichts über den Streit, ob US-Gerichte überhaupt zuständig sind, kann nun das eigentliche Verfahren beginnen.

Österreich geht weiter von Erfolg aus

Die Republik ist trotz der Niederlage weiter zuversichtlich, den Streit unm die wertvollen Gemälde zu gewinnen. Gottfried Toman von der Finanzprokuratur betonte, es sei "lediglich die Gerichtszuständigkeit entschieden - nicht mehr und nicht weniger."

Österreich betrachte die Bilder weiterhin als Eigentum der Republik. Toman ist davon überzeugt, dass Österreich dies bei dem Verfahren auch beweisen und letztlich Recht bekommen wird.

Altmann optimistisch

Sehr optimistisch zeigte sich auch Altmanns Anwalt, Randol Schoenberg. "Ich sehe nicht, wie eine vernünftig denkende Person daran zweifeln könnte", sagte er.

US-Gericht wird entscheiden

Nach dem Verfahrensstreit darüber, welches Gericht für den Fall zuständig ist, soll nun ein US-Gericht klären, wer rechtmäßiger Eigentümer der Bilder ist: die Republik Österreich oder die heute 88-jährige Bloch-Bauer-Nichte Altmann, die in Los Angeles lebt.

Droht eine Welle an Klagen?

Die Entscheidung des Supreme Court könnte weitreichende Folgen haben. Die Entscheidung wird Opfer von Grausamkeiten während des Zweiten Weltkriegs ermutigen, Klage einzureichen.

Frauen, die behaupten, während des Weltkriegs als Sexsklavinnen missbraucht worden zu sein, haben Japan in den USA verklagt; Holocaust-Überlebende und deren Nachfolger haben eine Klage gegen die französische Eisenbahn eingebracht, weil sie mehr als 70.000 Juden und andere Verfolgte in die KZs transportierte.

Mögliche Stolpersteine

Der Höchstrichter John Stevens wies darauf hin, dass das Außenministerium Gerichte noch immer bitten könne, solche Klagen nicht anzuerkennen. Der Richter Stephen Breyer meinte, dass US-Bürger wahrscheinlich ihre Forderungen zuerst in dem betreffenden Land geltend machen müssten.

Konkret ging es in dem Verfahren um ein Gesetz von 1976, in dem festgelegt wurde, wann andere Staaten in den USA verklagt werden können. Der Supreme Court entschied nun, dass das Gesetz auch rückwirkend angewandt werden kann.

Warnung vor Folgen

Jene drei Richter, die dagegen stimmten, warnten dagegen vor negativen Folgen für die die internationalen Beziehungen der USA.

Langer Streit um Rückgabe
Maria Altmann, 88-jährige Nichte von Adele und Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer klagte die Republik.

       In dem in den USA anhängigen Rechtsstreit "Maria Altmann gegen die Republik Österreich bzw. die Österreichische Galerie" geht es um die Rückgabe der Bilder "Adele Bloch-Bauer I", " Adele Bloch-Bauer II", "Apfelbaum I", "Buchenwald (Birkenwald)" und "Häuser in Unterach am Attersee" sowie "Amalie Zuckerkandl" von Gustav Klimt.

Die Bilder gehören heute zu den wertvollsten Kunstschätzen der Österreichischen Galerie im Belvedere und ziehen viele Touristen an.

Testament und Flucht vor Nazis

Die ersten fünf davon sind im Testament von Adele Bloch-Bauer erwähnt. Darin bat sie ihren Mann Ferdinand, nach seinem Tode "meine zwei Porträts und die vier Landschaften" der Republik Österreich bzw. der Österreichischen Galerie zu hinterlassen. Adele starb 1925.

Nach dem "Anschluss" an Nazi-Deutschland musste der jüdische Zuckerindustrielle und Kunstsammler Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer nach Prag und dann nach Zürich fliehen, wo er 1945 mittellos starb. In einem Testament setzte er seinen Neffen und seine zwei Nichten als Alleinerben ein.

Sein Vermögen, darunter auch die Bilder, wurde jedoch bereits nach seiner Flucht im Zuge der "Arisierung" des Eigentums von Juden einem kommissarischen Verwalter, Erich Führer, übereignet. Dieser übergab bzw. verkaufte die Bilder an das Museum.

Gutachter-Streit über Testament

Die Bitte Adele Bloch-Bauers an ihren Ehemann, die Klimt-Bilder nach dessen Tod der Galerie zu übergeben, wurde in einem Gutachten der Finanzprokuratur als verbindlich qualifiziert, daher habe die Galerie mit der tatsächlichen Übergabe der Bilder bzw. deren Ankauf vom Nazi-Verwalter Führer Eigentum erlangt - obwohl Ferdinand zu diesem Zeitpunkt noch lebte.

Auf Grund dieses Gutachtens des Vizepräsidenten der Finanzprokuratur, Manfred Kremser, hatte sich im Jahr 1999 der Kunstrückgabebeirat in einer Empfehlung gegen eine Rückgabe ausgesprochen. Bundesministerin Elisabeth Gehrer (ÖVP) hatte daraufhin den Erben empfohlen, den Klagsweg zu beschreiten.

Kein Erwerb des Eigentums

Ein Rechtsgutachten von Rudolf Welser, Zivilrechtsprofessor an der Universität Wien, und seines Assistenten Christian Rabl kommt jedoch zu einem anderen Schluss als die Finanzprokuratur und sieht keinen Eigentumserwerb während der Nazi-Zeit durch die Republik Österreich.

Die Kernaussagen: "Die Republik Österreich hat in der Zeit zwischen 1923 und 1948 weder einen Anspruch auf die Klimt-Bilder noch das Eigentum daran erworben. Die Voraussetzungen für eine Ermächtigung zur unentgeltlichen Rückgabe der Bilder an die Erben nach Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer gemäß § 1 des Bundesgesetzes über die Rückgabe von Kunstgegenständen aus den Österreichischen Bundesmuseen und Sammlungen vom 4. 12. 1998 bestehen."

Nichte selbst ein Nazi-Opfer

Die Klägerin im anhängigen Verfahren, Maria Altmann, ist eine Nichte von Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer. Sie musste selber nach dem Einmarsch der Nazis in Österreich fliehen, ihr Ehemann Fritz wurde einige Zeit im Konzentrationslager Dachau festgehalten.

Über die Niederlande gelangte sie in die USA, wo sie als US-Staatsbürgerin in Kalifornien lebt. Sie ist heute 88 Jahre alt und hat bereits vor Gericht ausgesagt, damit auch bei einer möglichen weiteren Verzögerung des Verfahrens ihre Aussage erhalten bleibt.

Klage in Österreich zu teuer

Anwalt Randol Schoenberg hatte für Altmann im Jahr 2000 in den USA eine Klage gegen die Republik Österreich eingebracht, nachdem eine Klage in Österreich auf Grund des hohen Streitwerts (145 Mio. Euro) aus Kostengründen nicht weiter verfolgt werden konnte. Die Klägerin hätte Gerichtsgebühren von damals 24 Mio. S (1,74 Mio. Euro) hinterlegen müssen.

Gerichte entscheiden gegen Österreich

Zunächst wurde in Kalifornien in erster Instanz festgestellt, dass die Klage tatsächlich vor einem amerikanischen Gericht verhandelt werden kann. Dagegen hat die Republik berufen. Ein Berufungsgericht gab wieder den Klägern recht, die Republik rief dagegen das US-Höchstgericht in Washington an.

US-Regierung auf Seiten Wiens

Die US-Regierung gab eine Stellungnahme als "amicus curiae" (Rechtsfreund) ab, in der sie sich der Rechtsposition Österreichs anschließt. Die Republik Österreich sei durch Immunität vor der Klage geschützt. Die Regierung hatte vor möglichen Folgen für die internationalen Beziehungen der USA gewarnt.
 

07. Juni 2004
21:16 MEZ        Restitutionsfall Bloch-Bauer: US-Gerichte zuständig
US-Höchstgericht in Washington entschied in Streit um Klimt-Bilder
 

    Washington - Im Rechtsstreit um sechs wertvolle Klimt-Bilder, die früher der jüdischen Familie Bloch-Bauer gehörten und nun im Besitz der Österreichischen Galerie sind, hat das US-Höchstgericht am Montag für eine Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichtsbarkeit erkannt. Die Klägerin Maria Altmann, vertreten durch Anwalt Randol Schoenberg, hat sich somit gegen die beklagte Republik Österreich bzw. die Österreichische Galerie durchgesetzt. Die Entscheidung wurde im Internet unter www.supremecourtus.gov (als pdf unter "Recent Decisions" - "Republic of Austria v. Altmann") veröffentlicht, die Richter geben dazu keine Stellungnahme mehr ab.

Die Entscheidung des Höchstgerichts fiel mit sechs zu drei Stimmen und kam für manche Beobachter überraschend, da die US-Regierung die Position der Republik Österreich unterstützt hatte. Das Urteil sagt noch nichts aus über das Eigentum, sondern ermöglicht Altmann nun eine inhaltliche Prüfung des Anspruchs auf Herausgabe der Bilder vor US-Gerichten.

"Nicht nur Rosinen herauspicken"

Altmanns Anwalt Randol Schoenberg dankte in einer Aussendung allen, die ihn in diesem Fall unterstützt hatten.

Der Leiter des Presse- und Informationsdiensts an der österreichischen Botschaft in Washington, Christoph Meran, zeigte sich auf Anfrage von der Entscheidung "sehr überrascht" und enttäuscht. Vor einer ausführlichen Stellungnahme müsse jedoch die Entscheidung juristisch analysiert werden.

Zwar wenig erfreut, aber trotzdem guter Dinge, den Rechtsstreit um die sechs Klimt-Bilder gewinnen zu können, reagierte Gottfried Toman von der Finanzprokuratur: "Es wurde lediglich die Gerichtszuständigkeit entschieden - nicht mehr und nicht weniger", so Toman. Österreich betrachte die Bilder weiterhin als Eigentum der Republik. Toman ist davon überzeugt, dass Österreich dies bei dem Verfahren auch beweisen und letztlich Recht bekommen wird. "Außerdem wird ja nach österreichischem Recht verhandelt", meinte der Zuständige bei der Finanzprokuratur. Die amerikanischen Kollegen könnten sich da "nicht nur die Rosinen herauspicken".

Vorgeschichte

In dem Prozess geht es um zwei Porträts von Adele Bloch-Bauer und vier Landschaften, die von Gustav Klimt geschaffen wurden: "Adele Bloch-Bauer I", " Adele Bloch-Bauer II", "Apfelbaum I", "Buchenwald (Birkenwald)" und "Häuser in Unterach am Attersee" sowie "Amalie Zuckerkandl". Die ersten fünf davon sind im Testament von Adele Bloch-Bauer erwähnt, in dem sie ihren Mann Ferdinand bat, nach seinem Tod die Bilder der Republik Österreich bzw. der Österreichischen Galerie zu schenken. Der jüdische Industrielle Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer wurde in der NS-Zeit enteignet und musste in die Schweiz flüchten, die Bilder wurden noch zu seinen Lebzeiten von einem von den Nazis eingesetzten "kommissarischen Verwalter" an das Museum übergeben bzw. verkauft. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer hatte in seinem Testament seinen Neffen und seine zwei Nichten als Alleinerben eingesetzt.

Das dem Zuständigkeitsstreit folgende Gerichtsverfahren soll klären, wer rechtmäßiger Eigentümer der Bilder ist: die Republik Österreich oder die heute 88-jährige Bloch-Bauer-Nichte Maria Altmann, die in Los Angeles lebt. Altmann musste nach dem Einmarsch der Nazis in Österreich fliehen. Über die Niederlande gelangte sie in die USA, wo sie als US-Staatsbürgerin in Kalifornien lebt. Anwalt Schoenberg hatte für Altmann im Jahr 2000 in den USA eine Klage gegen die Republik Österreich eingebracht, nachdem sie eine Klage in Österreich auf Grund des hohen Streitwerts aus Kostengründen nicht weiter verfolgte.

In Kalifornien hat ein Gericht in erster Instanz festgestellt, dass die Klage tatsächlich vor einem amerikanischen Gericht verhandelt werden kann. Dagegen hat die Republik Österreich berufen. Ein US-Berufungsgericht gab wieder der Klägerin recht, die Republik rief dagegen das US-Höchstgericht in Washington an. Die US-Regierung gab eine Stellungnahme als "amicus curiae" (Rechtsfreund) ab, in der sie sich der Rechtsposition Österreichs anschloss. Die Republik Österreich sei durch Immunität aus Gründen des Völkerrechts vor der Klage geschützt. Die Höchstrichter folgten der Position der US-Regierung jedoch mehrheitlich nicht und entschieden im Sinne der Klägerin Altmann für eine Zuständigkeit der US-Gerichtsbarkeit. (APA)
 
 

Freude bei Anwalt von Altmann
Schoenberg: Schüssel sollte "Fehler der Eltern und Großeltern" nicht wiederholen.

       Randol Schoenberg, Anwalt der Klägerin im Klimt-Bilder-Rechtsstreit Maria Altmann, hat sich am Montag in einer ersten Reaktion "sehr glücklich" über die Entscheidung des US-Höchstgerichts gezeigt, wonach die US-Gerichte in dem Fall zuständig sind.

"Wir sind sehr dankbar, dass wir eine klare Mehrheit der Richter auf unserer Seite haben, besonders weil die US-Regierung auf der Seite Österreichs stand", freute sich Schoenberg über die mit sechs zu drei Stimmen getroffene Entscheidung des Supreme Court.

Nun hoffe er auf eine baldige Prüfung der inhaltlichen Ansprüche vor einem US-Gericht.

"Gerechtigkeit hat gesiegt"

Die 88-jährige Klägerin Maria Altmann, die vor den Nazis aus Österreich flüchten musste, habe zu ihm gesagt, "Gott sei Dank, die Gerechtigkeit hat gesiegt".

Der Anwalt der Republik Österreich, Scott Cooper, habe ihm zu dem Sieg vor dem Höchstgericht gratuliert. Von offizieller österreichischer Seite habe er bisher keine Reaktion erhalten, erklärte Schoenberg auf Anfrage der APA.

Schoenberg siegesgewiss

Schoenberg zeigte sich zuversichtlich, nun nach dem Streit um die Zuständigkeit den Fall auch inhaltlich vor US-Gerichten zu gewinnen. "Ich sehe nicht, wie eine vernünftig denkende Person daran zweifeln könnte", sagte er und verwies auf ein Gutachten von Universitätsprofessor Rudolf Welser zu dem Fall.

Tipps für Schüssel und Gehrer

An die österreichische Regierung appellierte Schoenberg, sich den Fall noch einmal anzusehen. Bundeskanzler Wolfgang Schüssel (ÖVP), Bildungsministerin Elisabeth Gehrer (ÖVP) und Finanzminister Karl-Heinz Grasser sollten sich künftig besser beraten lassen, meinte er unter Verweis auf die Finanzprokuratur.

"Sie sollen nicht die Fehler ihrer Eltern und Großeltern wiederholen und diese gestohlene Kunst behalten wollen", sagte Schoenberg.

Gutachten gegen Rückgabe

Auf Grund eines Gutachtens des Vizepräsidenten der Finanzprokuratur, Manfred Kremser, hatte sich im Jahr 1999 der Kunstrückgabebeirat in einer Empfehlung gegen eine Rückgabe der wertvollen Klimt-Bilder ausgesprochen. Bundesministerin Gehrer (ÖVP) hatte daraufhin den Bloch-Bauer-Erben empfohlen, den Klagsweg zu beschreiten.