Home

News


EC
Yahoo Loses Appeal in Nazi Memorabilia Case
Ê
Federal court rules Yahoo not significantly harmed in case.

Juan Carlos Perez, IDG News Service
Thursday, January 12, 2006

Yahoo today lost a legal battle in its fight to make a French court's order against the company unenforceable in the United States.
Advertisement

In 2000, a French court ruled that Yahoo had to make it impossible for residents of France to participate in Nazi memorabilia auctions and to access content of that nature. If it failed to comply, Yahoo would have to pay a fine.

That lawsuit in France was brought by the Union of Jewish Students in France (UEJF) and the League Against Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICRA).

On Thursday, the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, in a 99-page decision, dismissed Yahoo's most recent appeal.

Six judges rejected Yahoo's arguments, for two different reasons. Three judges ruled that California courts have no jurisdiction over the French organizations. Another three judges stated that the case isn't "ripe," meaning Yahoo hasn't suffered sufficient hardship stemming from the French court's decision.

"It is extremely unlikely that any penalty, if assessed, could ever be enforced against Yahoo in the United States. Further, First Amendment harm may not exist at all, given the possibility that Yahoo has now 'in large measure' complied with the French court's orders through its voluntary actions, unrelated to the orders," the decision reads.
 

Background

Originally, Yahoo, saying it would be impossible to filter out users from a specific country to keep them from participating in such auctions and viewing such content, decided to remove the Nazi items and content from its Web site.

However, Yahoo later sued UEJF and LICRA in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in San Jose to have the French court's verdict declared unenforceable in the United States, arguing that it violates the right to free speech.

The district court sided with Yahoo; the French parties, however, filed an appeal with the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, which they won. Yahoo then asked the appeals court to again hear the case with 11 judges. That appeal was argued in March 2005, and the court's decision was handed down today.
 

More on Ruling

If Yahoo hasn't "in large measure" complied with the French court's orders, there is some possibility that in further restricting access to French users, Yahoo might have to restrict access to U.S. users, the court said. "But this possibility is, at this point, highly speculative. This level of harm is not sufficient to overcome the factual uncertainty bearing on the legal question presented and thereby to render this suit ripe," the decision further reads.

Yahoo now has the option to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. An attorney representing Yahoo in the case didn't immediately return a call seeking comment.

"We were seeking dismissal, so this is a win for my clients, and we're very happy about that," said E. Randol Schoenberg, from the law firm Burris & Schoenberg in Los Angeles, who acted as lead counsel for UEJF and LICRA.

The court's decision on the issues of jurisdiction and ripeness were right on target, Schoenberg said in an interview. "Just because someone sues you in a foreign country doesn't mean you can come here and sue them," Schoenberg said.
 
 

ABC News
Court Dismisses Yahoo Free Speech Suit
Court Tosses Yahoo Suit That Questioned Liability for Selling Items Illegal in Other Countries

By DAVID KRAVETS Associated Press Writer

The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCOÊJan 12, 2006 ÑÊA federal appeals court on Thursday skirted answering whether Yahoo Inc. must pay a fine of about $15 million to a Paris court for displaying Nazi memorabilia for sale in violation of French law.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed a federal lawsuit brought by Yahoo in California challenging the fine levied five years ago for running an auction site in which French users could buy and sell the memorabilia banned in France.
Yahoo asked the U.S. court to rule that the judgment could not be collected in the United States because it violated the company's free speech rights.

In a 99-page decision, the court left open the central question of whether U.S.-based Internet service providers are liable for damages in foreign courts for displaying content that is unlawful overseas but protected in the United States.
The court said it was unlikely the French would ever enforce the judgment and doubted Yahoo's free speech rights under U.S. law were violated.
Yahoo's French subsidiary, yahoo.fr, complies with French law, but a judge there nonetheless ordered the Sunnyvale-based company to strip Nazi paraphernalia from the portal's main site, Yahoo.com.
Yahoo eventually banned Nazi material as it began charging users to make auction listings, saying it did not want to profit from such material. But it continued to challenge the ruling, not in France but by filing a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Jose over the First Amendment issue.
A district judge in 2002 ruled in favor of Yahoo, saying the American company was not liable for the judgment. That decision was set aside Thursday.
The appeals court did agree that U.S. companies, including Yahoo, could turn to federal courts when overseas judgments inhibit speech protected in the United States.
But the court came to no conclusion about what type of speech it would consider shielding, doubting the presence of any First Amendment controversy to decide in this particular case.
"We have no ruling on the underlying First Amendment issue, which made this case so interesting in the first place," said Paul Schiff Berman, who teaches cyberlaw at the University of Connecticut.
Yahoo did not immediately return calls for comment.
 

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Court rules against Yahoo in Nazi speech case
 

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. Appeals court has thrown out a lawsuit by Yahoo Inc. (Nasdaq:YHOO - news), the world's largest media company, which had sought to overturn a French court's decision barring the sale of Nazi memorabilia on Yahoo's Web site.
ADVERTISEMENT

In a case that pitted freedom of speech rights enshrined under U.S. law against European anti-hate group statutes, the San Francisco-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed a district court ruling that had provided free speech protections to the U.S. company in its overseas operations.

The U.S. appeals court said that because Yahoo had complied "in large measure" with the French court's orders and barred the the sale of Nazi memorabilia from its site in France, Yahoo's free speech petition has become a moot issue.

"Unless and until Yahoo! changes its policy again, and thereby more clearly violates the French court's orders, it is unclear how much is now actually in dispute," the decision by a majority of the appeal court's 11 judges who heard the case.

A Yahoo spokesman said the Sunnyvale, California-based company was aware of the decision and formulating a response.

(Additional reporting by Jim Christie in San Francisco)
 

Appellate Court Refuses To Protect Yahoo From French Fine

POSTED: 3:31 pm PST January 12, 2006

SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court on Thursday skirted answering whether Yahoo Inc. was liable to pay a fine of about $15 million to a Paris court for displaying Nazi memorabilia for sale in violation of French law.
 

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed a federal lawsuit brought by Yahoo in California challenging the fine levied five years ago for allowing French users to buy and sell the memorabilia banned in France.

Yahoo asked the court to rule that the judgment could not be collected because it violated the company's free speech rights in the United States.

In a 99-page decision, the court left open the central question of whether U.S.-based Internet service providers are liable for damages in foreign courts for displaying content that is unlawful overseas but protected in the United States.

The court said it was unlikely the French would ever enforce the judgment, and doubted Yahoo's free speech rights under U.S. law were violated.

Yahoo's French subsidiary, yahoo.fr, complies with French law, but a judge there ordered the Sunnyvale-based company to strip Nazi paraphernalia from the portal's most popular site. Yahoo did not appeal the French order, but filed suit in U.S. District Court in San Jose over the First Amendment issue.

A San Jose federal judge in 2002 ruled in favor of Yahoo, saying the American company was not liable for the judgment. That decision that was set aside Thursday.
 

In Closely Watched Case, 9th Circuit Rejects Yahoo's Free Speech Argument
Case deals with unfamiliar ground involving Internet commerce's reach and
disparities among different countries' laws

Pam Smith
The Recorder
01-13-2006
 Printer-friendly  Email this Article  Reprints & Permissions

Ê
Yahoo's attempt to argue the First Amendment against a court order in France
was thwarted by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday, but over
procedural grounds rather than the Sunnyvale company's closely watched
constitutional argument.
The French court had threatened the Internet portal with financial penalties
unless it took measures to stop people in France from using Yahoo to view
auction listings for Nazi artifacts, or Nazi-apologist Web sites. YahooĠs
French subsidiary Web site has basically cut off such access, but YahooĠs
U.S. site can still be viewed by Internet users in France. The Silicon
Valley parent company has argued that restricting the objectionable content
from French viewers who go to its U.S. site would be technically difficult
and overly restrictive.
The case has been watched intently because it deals with unfamiliar legal
ground that involves both the global reach of Internet commerce and
disparities in different countries' laws. Lawyers from the American Civil
Liberties Union and for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce both filed amici curiae
briefs. "The issue that it presents is, when you have a world in which all
the nations are participants in a worldwide network, what standards should
be applied?" said Kurt Opsahl, a staff attorney at the San Francisco-based
Electronic Frontier Foundation who has followed the case.
It was a close call for E. Randol Schoenberg, a lawyer for the French
groups, who persuaded the 9th Circuit to throw out the case, with two
arguments that combined for success.
At the en banc hearing, he only persuaded three of the 11 judges to agree
with his jurisdiction argument, which he'd seen as the focus of the case.
But three other judges backed his argument that the case wasn't ripe enough
to be ruled on. Taken together, the six votes were enough to reverse an
earlier decision by U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel of the Northern
District of California.
Yahoo was sued in France in 2000 by two groups citing the anti-Nazi laws.
Later that year, a French court ordered the Internet portal to restrict
access for its French customers -- even if it meant reconfiguring its
California-based servers -- and gave it three months to do so before a daily
100,000 franc penalty would kick in.
Yahoo wanted a U.S. judge to declare that the French court's orders would
not be recognizable or enforceable here, and at the trial level, it
succeeded. The company sued La Ligue Contre Le Racisme et L'Antisemitisme
and L'Union des Etudiants Juifs de France, and Fogel ruled that the First
Amendment would preclude enforcement of the foreign orders in the U.S.
Among the 9th Circuit judges, the case appears to have been hotly debated.
On Thursday, three of them penned separate concurring opinions, and another
five signed onto a partial dissent bemoaning the outcome. Even the six who
agreed that the case should be dismissed without prejudice split on the
reasoning.
DEVIL IN THE DETAILS
Three judges said the case was too premature and abstract. To prevent
enforcement in the U.S., a foreign judgment must be "repugnant to public
policy," and the case isn't in any shape to tell if the French orders meet
that requirement, Judge William Fletcher wrote.
"Yahoo has chosen not to ask the French court" whether unrelated changes in
its policies -- like prohibiting auction listings that offer items
associated with primarily violent or hateful groups -- have indirectly
satisfied the foreign order, Fletcher wrote. "Instead, it has chosen to come
home to ask for a declaratory judgment that the French court's orders --
whatever they may or may not require, and whatever First Amendment questions
they may or may not present -- are unenforceable in the United States."
While it's possible that Yahoo could be forced to restrict its access to its
American users, that possibility is, at this point, "highly speculative,"
Fletcher wrote, and therefore not urgent enough. Combined with the
uncertainty of the legal question, Fletcher concluded, the case couldn't
overcome the ripeness hurdle. (If the French court's orders more explicitly
required Yahoo to block access to its U.S. users, he made clear that "this
would be a different and much easier case.")
The three other judges that agreed the case should be thrown out each wrote
a separate concurrence concluding that Yahoo shouldn't have been able to sue
the French defendant groups in California. "The Supreme Court has never
approved such a radical extension of personal jurisdiction," Judge Diarmuid
O'Scannlain wrote in one of them, adding that the majority had essentially
held that a foreign party subjects itself to a suit in the U.S. simply "by
litigating a bona fide claim in a foreign court and receiving a favorable
judgment."
The five judges who partially dissented all but accused the majority of
punting.
"If the majority's application of the First Amendment in the global Internet
context in this case is to become the standard ... then it should be adopted
(or not) after full consideration of the constitutional merits, not as a
justification for avoiding the issue altogether as not ripe," Judge Raymond
Fisher wrote.
If some judges feel Yahoo may be able to follow the foreign orders without
restricting its American customers, the trial court can resolve those
questions with more fact-finding, Fisher wrote. But that aside, Fisher said,
it's clear the orders are too vague and therefore unconstitutional on their
face. "Legions of cases permit First Amendment challenges to governmental
actions or decrees that on their face are vague, overbroad and threaten to
chill protected speech," Fisher wrote. "Indeed, the sweeping [order] here
presents just such a paradigmatic case."
A statement from Yahoo did not say if the company would appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court. But the company said it was pleased that the ruling indicated
U.S. courts can have jurisdiction if a foreign plaintiff tries to enforce
foreign orders of "censor-ship" on U.S. Web sites. "Based on today's ruling,
Yahoo believes that free speech rights would prevail," the statement said.
Schoenberg, who represented the French groups at oral argument, emphasized
that such an outcome wouldn't be assured. "I'm willing to bet that not every
circuit will agree with the ruling on personal jurisdiction."
The case is Yahoo v. La Ligue Contre Le Racisme et LĠAntisemitisme, 06
C.D.O.S. 360.
 

Court dismisses Yahoo's free speech lawsuit

By Declan McCullagh, Special to ZDNet
13 January 2006 04:03 PM

Ê Ê
A divided federal appeals court on Thursday ducked the question of whether a
French court order censoring Nazi-related materials can apply to Yahoo's
US-based Web site.

In a case that pits European restrictions on "hate speech" against the
values of free expression enshrined by the United States' First Amendment, a
slender 6-5 majority of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed
Yahoo's case involving the online display of Nazi-related books, posts and
memorabilia.

"Unless and until Yahoo changes its policy again, and thereby more clearly
violates the French court's orders, it is unclear how much is now actually
in dispute," one group of judges wrote. Also, those judges said, it's
"extremely unlikely" that any penalty could be assessed against Yahoo's US
operations.

In an unusual twist, the 11-judge panel fractured into multiple factions,
some of which said the case should be dismissed on technicalities or because
it was too preliminary, and others who said it was an easy call because the
French court order is clearly unenforceable under the US Constitution.

Yahoo filed the suit in December 2000 in an effort to clear up whether a US
company was required to rework its Web site to comply with a French court
order. In April of that year, the Paris-based International League against
Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICRA) took the Web portal to court to stop sales
of Nazi paraphernalia to French citizens on its auction site. French law
prohibits the sale or exhibition of objects associated with racism.

A French court agreed with LICRA. It required Yahoo to make it "impossible"
for French citizens to connect to a Yahoo Web site with messages relating to
Nazi objects, or ones that displayed excerpts from Adolf Hitler's "Mein
Kampf" and "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," or messages that contested
Nazi crimes.

But Yahoo won its initial court battle in the US. A federal district judge
ruled in November 2001 that "although France has the sovereign right to
regulate what speech is permissible in France, this court may not enforce a
foreign order that violates the protections of the United States
Constitution."

In a dissent on Thursday, a minority of 9th Circuit judges echoed that
argument. "Censoring speech we find repugnant does not comport with our
cherished First Amendment," the dissent said. "We should not allow a foreign
court order to be used as leverage to quash constitutionally protected
speech by denying the United States-based target an adjudication of its
constitutional rights in federal court."

Joel Reidenberg, a professor of law at Fordham University who wrote a law
review article on the topic, said he was alarmed that a majority of the 9th
Circuit found sufficient jurisdictional grounds existed to consider the
case.

"This is a radical and troubling expansion of U.S. jurisdiction that may put
US companies at risk abroad," Reidenberg said in e-mail. "In essence, the
majority would allow any US company that loses a lawsuit abroad to bring the
suit back to the US for a second bite at the apple." Now, he said, foreign
companies that lose in the US might take their dispute back to a more
friendly court at home.

The US case does not involve Yahoo's French subsidiary, which has complied
with French law.
 
 

C'est une ÇpremireÈ juridique dans la controverse sur la libertŽ
d'expression qui agite le Web: une cour d'appel de Californie a admis
qu'un tribunal franais pouvait interdire la vente sur le Net de
croix gammŽes ou d'insignes de SS. Elle a ainsi conclu, jeudi, le
diffŽrend entre Yahoo! et les associations franaises, au terme de
plusieurs annŽes de controverse fertile en rebondissements.
En 2000, le tribunal de Paris avait enjoint ˆ ce serveur, logŽ en
Californie, de supprimer toute vente d'objets nazis, dans les trois
mois sous astreinte de 15 000 euros par jour. Tout en tra”nant des
pieds, Yahoo! a renoncŽ ˆ faire appel. En 2001, le serveur a adoptŽ
un code de conduite proscrivant la mise aux enchres ou la promotion
d'objets associŽs Lj des groupes adoptant de positions raciales
haineuses et violentesÈ. Cela n'a pas empchŽ les magistrats
amŽricains de retrouver sur le site, des annŽes plus tard, des
timbres ou monnaies frappŽes de la croix gammŽe, des exemplaires de
Mein Kampf ou encore des forums antisŽmites et nŽgationnistes.
Paralllement, la sociŽtŽ a lancŽ une action en Californie, en
estimant que ce jugement violait la libertŽ d'expression, consacrŽe
par le Premier amendement. Yahoo! assurait que cette interdiction, ne
pouvant se limiter ˆ la France, affecterait inŽvitablement sa
clientle amŽricaine. Le serveur disait aussi redouter d'avoir ˆ
verser des indemnisations massives. Dans un premier temps, le
tribunal de San Jose lui a donnŽ raison. Finalement, ce jugement est
aujourd'hui renversŽ par la cour d'appel, qui a jugŽ ÇvagueÈ
l'argumentaire de Yahoo!, d'autant que rien n'indique que les
indemnisations lui soient rŽclamŽes. Signe que ce dŽbat sur la
libertŽ et le Net reste vif aux Etats-Unis, cette dŽcision a ŽtŽ
rendue ˆ l'arrachŽ, ˆ une majoritŽ d'une voix. Au-delˆ des points de
procŽdure soulevŽs dans cet arrt de plus de cent pages, c'est une
Çouverture sur le fondÈ, estime Me Randol Schoenberg, qui
reprŽsentait la LICRA (Ligue contre le racisme et l'antisŽmitisme) et
l'Union des Žtudiants juifs de France.  ÇPour la premire fois en
effet, explique Me Philippe Schmidt, avocat et vice-prŽsident de la
LICRA, les magistrats amŽricains abordent le fond du problme, en
refusant de considŽrer que le Premier amendement s'applique
automatiquement en dehors des Etats-Unis.È

------ End of Forwarded Message

Court dismisses Yahoo's free speech lawsuit

By Declan McCullagh, Special to ZDNet
13 January 2006 04:03 PM

Ê Ê
A divided federal appeals court on Thursday ducked the question of whether a
French court order censoring Nazi-related materials can apply to Yahoo's
US-based Web site.

In a case that pits European restrictions on "hate speech" against the
values of free expression enshrined by the United States' First Amendment, a
slender 6-5 majority of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed
Yahoo's case involving the online display of Nazi-related books, posts and
memorabilia.

"Unless and until Yahoo changes its policy again, and thereby more clearly
violates the French court's orders, it is unclear how much is now actually
in dispute," one group of judges wrote. Also, those judges said, it's
"extremely unlikely" that any penalty could be assessed against Yahoo's US
operations.

In an unusual twist, the 11-judge panel fractured into multiple factions,
some of which said the case should be dismissed on technicalities or because
it was too preliminary, and others who said it was an easy call because the
French court order is clearly unenforceable under the US Constitution.

Yahoo filed the suit in December 2000 in an effort to clear up whether a US
company was required to rework its Web site to comply with a French court
order. In April of that year, the Paris-based International League against
Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICRA) took the Web portal to court to stop sales
of Nazi paraphernalia to French citizens on its auction site. French law
prohibits the sale or exhibition of objects associated with racism.

A French court agreed with LICRA. It required Yahoo to make it "impossible"
for French citizens to connect to a Yahoo Web site with messages relating to
Nazi objects, or ones that displayed excerpts from Adolf Hitler's "Mein
Kampf" and "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," or messages that contested
Nazi crimes.

But Yahoo won its initial court battle in the US. A federal district judge
ruled in November 2001 that "although France has the sovereign right to
regulate what speech is permissible in France, this court may not enforce a
foreign order that violates the protections of the United States
Constitution."

In a dissent on Thursday, a minority of 9th Circuit judges echoed that
argument. "Censoring speech we find repugnant does not comport with our
cherished First Amendment," the dissent said. "We should not allow a foreign
court order to be used as leverage to quash constitutionally protected
speech by denying the United States-based target an adjudication of its
constitutional rights in federal court."

Joel Reidenberg, a professor of law at Fordham University who wrote a law
review article on the topic, said he was alarmed that a majority of the 9th
Circuit found sufficient jurisdictional grounds existed to consider the
case.

"This is a radical and troubling expansion of U.S. jurisdiction that may put
US companies at risk abroad," Reidenberg said in e-mail. "In essence, the
majority would allow any US company that loses a lawsuit abroad to bring the
suit back to the US for a second bite at the apple." Now, he said, foreign
companies that lose in the US might take their dispute back to a more
friendly court at home.

The US case does not involve Yahoo's French subsidiary, which has complied
with French law.

High-Tech
13/01/2006
 
 

Yahoo condamnŽ ˆ se soumettre ˆ la justice franaise
LExpansion.com

Point final dans la procŽdure qui oppose depuis cinq ans Yahoo ˆ deux
associations franaises, la Licra et l'Union des Žtudiants juifs de France.
La cour californienne a finalement dŽboutŽ la firme amŽricaine qui se
retranchait derrire le 1er amendement de la constitution amŽricaine.

Au terme de cinq annŽes de procŽdure ˆ rebondissements, le gŽant amŽricain
Yahoo vient d'tre une nouvelle fois mis en Žchec par la justice amŽricaine
dans l'affaire liŽe ˆ la vente d'objets nazis. Le groupe a en effet ŽtŽ
dŽboutŽ par une cour d'appel californienne sur sa plainte demandant
l'invalidation d'une dŽcision de justice franaise lui interdisant la mise
aux enchres d'objets nazis.
-- PUBLICITE --
 RŽsumŽ des Žpisodes prŽcŽdents. En mai 2000, suite ˆ la plainte dŽposŽe
pour faire interdire la vente en ligne d'objets nazis par la Ligue contre le
racisme et l'antisŽmitisme (Licra) et l'Union des Žtudiants juifs de France
(UEJF), le tribunal de grande instance de Paris ordonne ˆ Yahoo de dŽtruire
dans un dŽlai de trois mois tous les messages liŽs ˆ ces transactions sur
son sites d'enchres hŽbergŽ en Californie et ce, sous astreinte de 100.000
francs (15.000 euros) par jour. Yahoo s'exŽcute de mauvaise gr‰ce et avec un
certain retard. Il annonce dŽbut 2001 adopter une politique beaucoup plus
restrictive ˆ l'Žgard de ce type d'objet, et proscrit la mise aux enchres
ou la promotion d'objets associŽs Çʈ des groupes adoptant des positions
raciales haineuses ou violentesÊÈ. Un vÏu pieux. Les magistrats amŽricains
constateront quelques annŽes plus tard sur le site la prŽsence d'objets
divers liŽs ˆ l'Žpoque nazi et la vitalitŽ de divers forums antisŽmites et
nŽgationnistes. Pour autant, la firme amŽricaine, qui n'a visiblement pas
apprŽciŽ de se voir rappeler ˆ l'ordre par la justice franaise, a entamŽ en
dŽcembre 2000 une procŽdure auprs d'un tribunal californien pour dŽclarer
le jugement franais inapplicable aux Etats-Unis en invoquant le premier
amendement de la Constitution amŽricaine sur la libertŽ d'expression. Ce
tribunal lui donne raison.
Mais l'affaire ne s'arrte pas lˆ. En aožt 2004, la cour d'appel de la 9me
circonscription amŽricaine qui couvre l'ouest des Etats-Unis casse ce
jugement sur la forme. Selon elle, la cour californienne aurait dž attendre
que la Licra et l'UEJF soumettent leur cas aux Etats-Unis pour contraindre
Yahoo ˆ payer l'amende. La procŽdure est une nouvelle fois relancŽe et, en
fŽvrier 2005, la cour d'appel californienne accepte de rŽexaminer l'ensemble
du dossier sur le fond. C'est cet examen qui va tre fatal ˆ Yahoo. La cour
d'appel a, en effet, jugŽ ÇÊvagueÊÈ les arguments prŽsentŽs par Yahoo qui
prŽtendait d'une part que cette interdiction, ne pouvant se limiter ˆ la
France, affecterait inŽvitablement sa clientle amŽricaine et d'autre part,
redoutait ˆ avoir ˆ verser des indemnisations massives. Les juges ont refusŽ
de dŽclarer inapplicable aux Etats-Unis une dŽcision prise par un tribunal
de juridiction franaise. Me Philippe Schmidt, avocat et vice-prŽsident de
la Licra s'est fŽlicitŽ de cette dŽcision en estimant que les juges
amŽricains ÇÊabordaient pour la premire fois le fonds du problme, en
refusant de considŽrer que le Premier amendement s'applique automatiquement
en-dehors des Etats-UnisÊÈ.

LExpansion.com

 

OBJETS NAZIS

Revers pour Yahoo!
aux Etats-Unis

NOUVELOBS.COM | 13.01.06 | 18:33

Une cour d'appel estime que le jugement franais sur la vente aux enchres
d'objets nazis est applicable sur le territoire amŽricain.

Ê
Une cour d'appel amŽricaine a infligŽ jeudi 12 janvier un Žchec au gŽant de
l'internet Yahoo! dans son diffŽrend judiciaire avec deux associations
franaises, en refusant de dŽclarer inapplicable aux Etats-Unis une dŽcision
d'un tribunal parisien.
Cette affaire, qui remonte ˆ plus de cinq ans, a commencŽ lorsque la Ligue
contre le racisme et l'antisŽmitisme (Licra) et l'Union des Žtudiants juifs
de France (UEJF) ont portŽ plainte contre Yahoo! pour faire interdire la
vente en ligne sur son site amŽricain d'objets nazis, prohibŽe en France.
En mai 2000, le tribunal de grande instance de Paris avait ordonnŽ ˆ Yahoo!
de dŽtruire dans les trois mois tous les messages concernant la vente
d'objets nazis sur son site d'enchres hŽbergŽ en Californie, et ce sous
astreinte de 100.000 francs (15.000 euros) par jour.
Yahoo! ne s'Žtait exŽcutŽ qu'avec retard et avait demandŽ en dŽcembre 2000 ˆ
un tribunal d'instance de San Francisco de dŽclarer le jugement franais
inapplicable aux Etats-Unis, en invoquant le premier amendement de la
Constitution amŽricaine qui garantit la libertŽ d'expression.
Argumentaire "vague"
 
Le tribunal californien avait donnŽ raison ˆ Yahoo! mais en aožt 2004, la
cour d'appel de la 9e circonscription judiciaire, qui couvre l'ouest des
Etats-Unis, a cassŽ ce jugement pour des raisons de forme, estimant qu'il
Žtait prŽmaturŽ.
Selon la juridiction, ce tribunal aurait dž attendre que la Licra et l'UEJF
prŽsentent leur cas aux Etats-Unis pour contraindre l'entreprise ˆ payer
l'amende.
Jeudi, la Cour d'appel, dans une dŽcision de six de ses juges contre cinq, a
rejetŽ, cette fois sur le fond, une nouvelle demande de Yahoo! de dŽclarer
la dŽcision franaise inapplicable, estimant que celle-ci ne violait pas les
droits de Yahoo! relatifs ˆ la libertŽ d'expression et que l'argumentaire de
l'entreprise Žtait "vague".
Les juges ont toutefois dit douter que la France demande aujourd'hui
l'exŽcution d'un jugement vieux de cinq ans et demi, dont l'amende cumulŽe
pourrait atteindre aprs cette pŽriode des millions de dollars.

vendredi 13 janvier 2006, 19h25
Yahoo ˆ nouveau dŽboutŽ dans l'affaire des enchres nazies

Une cour d'appel amŽricaine a refusŽ d'accorder ˆ Yahoo la protection du
Premier Amendement, garantissant la libertŽ d'expression. Pas ˆ cause de
questions de fond, mais simplement parce qu'il n'est pas poursuivi aux
ƒtats-Unis par la justice franaise.

Est-ce la finÊd'un dŽbatÊjuridiqueÊqui dure depuis plus de cinq ans? Une
cour d'appel amŽricaine vient de dŽbouter Yahoo IncÊdans l'affaire des
enchres nazies proposŽes sur son portail amŽricain. Les juges se sont
toutefois montrŽs trs divisŽs sur ce cas, o la question de la libertŽ
d'expression a ŽtŽ beaucoup discutŽe.

Rappel des faits: en 2000, le groupe amŽricainÊest condamnŽÊpar le tribunal
de grande instance de Paris, ˆ bloquer l'accs des internautes franais ˆ
ces contenus illicites, interdits ˆ la vente dans l'Hexagone. Il avait trois
mois pour se conformer ˆ cette dŽcision, sous astreinte d'une amende de
15.000 euros par jour de retard.

Yahoo FranceÊa exŽcutŽÊcette dŽcision trs rapidement, en supprimant tout
contenu illicite de ses pages et les liens menant vers son portail
amŽricain.

Mais la question s'est ensuite posŽe de savoir si la dŽcision d'un juge
franais pouvaitÊs'appliquer aussi ˆ la maison mre, Yahoo Inc, soumise elle
au droit amŽricain.

Pas de demande des plaignants aux ƒtats-Unis

Le groupe amŽricainÊa doncÊcherchŽ ˆ se prŽmunir contre toute tentative
d'incursion de la justice franaise sur son territoire. CarÊdu faitÊde
l'astreinte, les deux plaignants, la Ligue internationale contre le racisme
et l'antisŽmitisme (Licra) et l'Union des Žtudiants juifs de France (UEJF),
auraient pu rŽclamer jusqu'ˆ 15 millions de dollars, selon les estimations.

En 2001, Yahoo Inc a donc demandŽ ˆ la justice amŽricaine une injonction
prŽliminaire, dŽclarant la dŽcision du TGI de Paris non applicable sur le
sol amŽricain.ÊEnÊrŽclamant la protection du Premier Amendement de la
Constitution, qui garantit la libertŽ d'expression. Il a obtenu gain cause
en premire instance, avant que cette dŽcision ne soit cassŽe en appel en
2004.

C'est cette dŽcision qui vient d'tre ˆ nouveau confirmŽe par la cour du 9e
"circuit" de San Francisco (dernier recours avant la Cour suprme). Ë six
voix contre cinq, les juges ont estimŽ que la demande de Yahoo Žtait
irrecevable, car ni la Licra, ni l'UEJF n'ont amenŽ le litige devant une
juridiction amŽricaine.

ÇË moins que Yahoo ne change ˆ nouveau sa politique, et ainsi viole de faon
plus Žvidente la dŽcision de justice franaise, il est difficile de dire
actuellement ce qui est en jeuÈ, Žcrivent-ils. Selon eux, il est par
ailleurs trs peu probable que des amendes puissent tre infligŽes au groupe
amŽricain. D'o le refus d'accŽder ˆ la demande de Yahoo.

Avec Declan McCullagh, pour CNET News.com

AFFAIRE YAHOO!

"Le triomphe du droit franais
sur le plan international"

NOUVELOBS.COM | 13.01.06 | 15:46
 

 

par GŽrard Haas,
avocat ˆ la Cour,
docteur en droit.
Dans cette "affaire Yahoo", quel a ŽtŽ le cheminement juridique qui a amenŽ
une plainte dŽposŽe par des associations franaises ˆ provoquer une dŽcision
de la Cour d'Appel de la 9 circonscription judiciaire aux Etats-Unis?
- Tout a commencŽ en mai 2000 lorsque lĠUEJF a fait constater par huissier
que sur le site yahoo.com accessible aux internautes franais, figurait une
page de vente aux enchres proposant ˆ la vente des objets nazis ; faits
rŽprŽhensibles pŽnalement en droit franais.
En effet, la simple visualisation en France de tels objets constitue une
violation de lĠarticle R. 645-1 du Code PŽnal et donc un trouble ˆ lĠordre
public interne franais.
LĠUEJF et la LICRA ont alors saisi le Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris
en rŽfŽrŽ pour obtenir la fermeture de ce site.
Le 22 mai 2000 le TGI de Paris a ainsi ordonnŽ ˆ Yahoo Inc. de: "prendre
toutes les mesures de nature ˆ dissuader et ˆ rendre impossible toute
consultation sur Yahoo.com du service de ventes aux enchres d'objets nazis
et de tout autre site ou service qui constituent une apologie du nazisme ou
une contestation des crimes nazis".
Yahoo Inc.
a ensuite saisi la Cour de District de San JosŽ (Californie) qui a considŽrŽ
dans son jugement du 7 novembre 2001 que "bien que la France ait le droit
souverain de contr™ler le type dĠexpression autorisŽe sur son territoire,
cette cour ne pourrait appliquer une ordonnance Žtrangre qui viole la
Constitution des Etats-Unis en empchant la pratique d'une expression
protŽgŽe ˆ lĠintŽrieur de nos frontires".
Dans le prolongement de ce jugement, la Cour dĠappel du 9me District de
Californie a annulŽ ce premier jugement pour des questions de procŽdure par
un arrt du 23 aožt 2004. En effet, elle a considŽrŽ que "la France est dans
son droit, comme nation souveraine, de voter des lois contre la diffusion de
contenus racistes et nazi en rŽponse aux terribles agissements des armŽes
Nazies durant la Seconde guerre mondiale. De mme, la LICRA et lĠUEJF sont
dans leur droit de saisir la justice en France ˆ lĠencontre de Yahoo! afin
de faire sanctionner les violations aux lois franaises".
Les magistrats amŽricains estimaient donc que Yahoo Inc, ne pouvait pas, ˆ
la suite de la dŽcision franaise, saisir les juridictions amŽricaines afin
de faire constater lĠincompatibilitŽ du jugement franais avec les principes
de la libertŽ dĠexpression fixŽs par le Premier amendement.
La dernire dŽcision rendue le 12 janvier 2006 par la Cour dĠappel du 9me
district de Californie a confirmŽ sa position en rejetant la demande de
Yahoo visant ˆ dŽclarer la dŽcision franaise inapplicable estimant que
celle-ci ne violait pas les droits de Yahoo relatifs ˆ la libertŽ
dĠexpression protŽgŽ par le 1er amendement de la Constitution amŽricaine.
La question de lĠapplication de la loi franaise aux Etats-Unis demeure donc
en suspens tant que lĠUEJF et la LICRA nĠauront pas demandŽ outre-Atlantique
lĠexŽcution de lĠordonnance franaise du 22 mai 2000.
Existe-t-il des prŽcŽdents en matire de droit international et si non, que
va entra”ner cette dŽcision?
- L'exequatur (procŽdure qui permet de faire dŽclarer exŽcutoire dans un
Etat un jugement ou une dŽcision arbitrale ou autre rendu dans un autre) des
jugements rendus ˆ l'Žtranger pose des questions de droit international
dŽlicates et touche ˆ la souverainetŽ des Etats.
En matire dĠInternet, il semble que cette affaire soit une premire. Il
faut savoir quĠil nĠexiste aucune convention portant sur lĠexŽcution des
jugements entre la France et les Etats-Unis.
En tout Žtat de cause, la dŽcision de la Cour dĠappel de Californie confirme
quĠune sociŽtŽ amŽricaine diffusant des contenus nŽgationnistes sur la Toile
devra respecter sur le territoire franais la loi franaise et devra prendre
toute mesure pour supprimer lĠaccs ˆ ces contenus interdits aux citoyens de
lĠhexagone alors mme que cette diffusion est autorisŽe aux Etats-Unis.
LĠaffaire Yahoo rŽvle donc le triomphe du droit franais et de ses valeurs
les plus fondamentales sur le plan international. Cette dŽcision du juge
amŽricain, malgrŽ le sacro-saint 1er amendement de la Constitution
amŽricaine, est une victoire pour tous les dŽfenseurs des droits de lĠHomme
De plus, en rgle gŽnŽrale, le juge amŽricain accorde relativement
facilement lĠexequatur aux jugements franais aprs avoir vŽrifiŽ la
rŽgularitŽ de ces jugements au regard du droit amŽricain (jugement
dŽfinitif, tribunal impartial, absence de fraude, objet de lĠaction conforme
ˆ lĠordre public de lĠEtatÉ).
Pour les autres Etats, il convient de distinguer selon que ceux-ci ont ŽtŽ
rendus par un ƒtat membre de l'Union EuropŽenne ou un ƒtat tiers, Žtant
prŽcisŽ quĠune convention internationale a ŽtŽ conclue entre les ƒtats
membres de l'Union EuropŽenne, simplifiant considŽrablement les conditions
d'octroi de l'exequatur. Par ailleurs, il convient de vŽrifier au cas par
cas, quels accords on ŽtŽ conclus (bilatŽraux ou multilatŽraux) lorsquĠil
sĠagit dĠEtats-Tiers.
Aujourd'hui les sites de ventes sur Internet s'appuient sur les lŽgislations
nationales du pays o ils sont implantŽs. Cette dŽcision de justice
ouvre-t-elle la voie ˆ des changements dans ce domaine?
- Non, en effet, les principaux changements tiennent ˆ la nature mme de
lĠInternet, rŽseau mondial transfrontalier.
Si les responsables des sites de vente sur lĠInternet se voient appliquer
normalement la lŽgislation du pays dans lequel ils sont Žtablis, toute
diffusion sur Internet, entra”ne de facto lĠapplication des lŽgislations des
pays o le contenu est accessibleÉ en dĠautres termes, partout dans le
monde.
Or, il est possible dĠobserver une pratique quasi constante dans la plupart
des pays: lorsquĠun Tribunal conna”t dĠune affaire ayant lĠInternet comme
moyen du dommage, il se dŽclarera quasi systŽmatiquement compŽtent et
refusera gŽnŽralement dĠappliquer une autre loi que la sienne.
DĠo lĠimportance dĠaffaires comme celle-ci qui contribuent ˆ "briser" les
carcans posŽs par les souverainetŽs nationales; ces dernires devant
sĠeffacer lorsque les droits de lĠHomme sont en jeu.
Nous assistons ici ˆ une lutte entre la rŽgulation des contenus illicites
sur le rŽseau et la libertŽ dĠexpression quasi absolue imposŽe par le
premier amendement de la Constitution amŽricaine.
La vraie question est lˆ: les Etats-Unis peuvent-ils impunŽment dicter leur
loi sur le rŽseau et porter atteintes aux droits de lĠhomme en imposant une
vison absolutiste de la libertŽ dĠexpression ?
Cette dŽcision rappelle aussi aux plus sceptiques que lĠInternet nĠest pas
une zone de non droit pour les particuliers, les entreprises, mais Žgalement
pour les Etats !
Propos recueillis par Solne Cordier
(le vendredi 13 janvier 2006)

Enchres nazies : Yahoo dŽboutŽ par la justice amŽricaine

Une cour d'appel de Californie a rejetŽ une plainte de Yahoo Inc., qui
demandait l'invalidation d'une dŽcision d'un tribunal franais lui
interdisant de mettre aux enchres des objets de l'Žpoque nazie.

parÊVincent NOCE
LIBERATION.FRÊ:Êvendredi 13 janvier 2006Ê-Ê18:37
 

C'est une ÇpremireÈ juridique dans la controverse sur la libertŽ
d'expression qui agite le Web: une cour d'appel de Californie a admis qu'un
tribunal franais pouvait interdire la vente sur le Net de croix gammŽes ou
d'insignes de SS. Elle a ainsi conclu, jeudi, le diffŽrend entre Yahoo! et
les associations franaises, au terme de plusieurs annŽes de controverse
fertile en rebondissements.

En 2000, le tribunal de grande instance de Paris avait enjoint au site de
supprimer toute vente d'objets nazis de son serveur d'enchres franais,
logŽ en Californie, dans les trois mois sous astreinte de 15.000 euros par
jour. Tout en tra”nant des pieds, Yahoo! a renoncŽ ˆ faire appel. En 2001,
il a adoptŽ un code de conduite proscrivant la mise aux enchres ou la
promotion d'objets associŽs Lj des groupes adoptant de positions raciales
haineuses et violentesÈ. Cela n'a pas empchŽ les magistrats amŽricains de
retrouver sur le site, des annŽes plus tard, des timbres ou monnaies
frappŽes de la croix gammŽe, des exemplaires de Mein Kampf ou encore des
forums antisŽmites et nŽgationnistes.

Paralllement, la sociŽtŽ a lancŽ une action en Californie, en estimant que
le jugement de 2000 violait la libertŽ d'expression, consacrŽe par le
Premier amendement de la consitution amŽricaine. Car Yahoo! assurait que
cette interdiction, ne pouvant se limiter ˆ la France, affecterait
inŽvitablement sa clientle amŽricaine. Le serveur disait aussi redouter
d'avoir ˆ verser des indemnisations massives. Dans un premier temps, le
tribunal de San Jose lui a donnŽ raison. Finalement, ce jugement est
aujourd'hui renversŽ Ñ sur le fond Ñ par la cour d'appel, qui a jugŽ ÇvagueÈ
l'argumentaire de Yahoo!, d'autant que rien n'indique que les indemnisations
lui soient rŽclamŽes. Signe que ce dŽbat sur la libertŽ et le Net reste vif
aux Etats-Unis, cette dŽcision a ŽtŽ rendue ˆ l'arrachŽ, ˆ une majoritŽ
d'une voix.

Au-delˆ des points de procŽdure soulevŽs dans cet arrt de plus de cent
pages, c'est une Çouverture sur le fondÈ, estime Me Randol Schoenberg, qui
reprŽsentait la LICRA (Ligue contre le racisme et l'antisŽmitisme) et
l'Union des Žtudiants juifs de France. ÇPour la premire fois en effet,
explique Me Philippe Schmidt, avocat et vice-prŽsident de la LICRA, les
magistrats amŽricains abordent le fond du problme, en refusant de
considŽrer que le Premier amendement s'applique automatiquement en dehors
des Etats-Unis.È
 

SAN FRANCISCO (AFP)
13 Janvier 2006 7h48
Echec pour Yahoo! dans son diffŽrend avec deux associations franaises

Une cour d'appel amŽricaine a infligŽ jeudi un Žchec au gŽant de l'internet
Yahoo! dans son diffŽrend judiciaire avec deux associations franaises, en
refusant de dŽclarer inapplicable aux Etats-Unis une dŽcision d'un tribunal
parisien.

Cette affaire, qui remonte ˆÊ plus de cinq ans, a commencŽ lorsque la Ligue
contre le racisme et l'antisŽmitisme (Licra) et l'Union des Žtudiants juifs
de France (UEJF) ont portŽ plainte contre Yahoo! pour faire interdire la
vente en ligne sur son site amŽricain d'objets nazis, prohibŽe en France.

En mai 2000, le tribunal de grande instance de Paris avait ordonnŽ ˆÊ Yahoo!
de dŽtruire dans les trois mois tous les messages concernant la vente
d'objets nazis sur son site d'enchres hŽbergŽ en Californie, et ce sous
astreinte de 100.000 francs (15.000 euros) par jour.

Yahoo! ne s'Žtait exŽcutŽ qu'avec retard et avait demandŽ en dŽcembre 2000
ˆÊ un tribunal d'instance de San Francisco de dŽclarer le jugement franais
inapplicable aux Etats-Unis, en invoquant le premier amendement de la
Constitution amŽricaine qui garantit la libertŽ d'expression.

Le tribunal californien avait donnŽ raison ˆÊ Yahoo! mais en aožt 2004, la
cour d'appel de la 9e circonscription judiciaire, qui couvre l'ouest des
Etats-Unis, a cassŽ ce jugement pour des raisons de forme, estimant qu'il
Žtait prŽmaturŽ.

Selon la juridiction, ce tribunal aurait dž attendre que la Licra et l'UEJF
prŽsentent leur cas aux Etats-Unis pour contraindre l'entreprise ˆÊ payer
l'amende.

Jeudi, la Cour d'appel, dans une dŽcision de six de ses juges contre cinq, a
rejetŽ, cette fois sur le fond, une nouvelle demande de Yahoo! de dŽclarer
la dŽcision franaise inapplicable, estimant que celle-ci ne violait pas les
droits de Yahoo! relatifs ˆÊ la libertŽ d'expression et que l'argumentaire
de l'entreprise Žtait "vague".

Les juges ont toutefois dit douter que la France demande aujourd'hui
l'exŽcution d'un jugement vieux de cinq ans et demi, dont l'amende cumulŽe
pourrait atteindre aprs cette pŽriode des millions de dollars.

İ 2006 AFP : Tous droits rŽservŽs.